Pacing in Serial Fiction

Posted by Akira | Posted in General Writing, Organization, Writing Projects | Posted on 17-02-2014

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This is going to be a short post, as I’m sick, nursing a fractured foot and sneaking to sit up to write. My apologies to the blog manager and readers!

Courtesy of dreamstime

Courtesy of dreamstime

When I was plotting out my novel, I really only tried to make sure my plot was advanced with each chapter, that I eliminated plot holes where I found them, and generally tied up the story in a nice, neat bow for readers.

Serial fiction is kind of different. I’m currently 7 chapters into posting Trials of The Hunt (as of this blog post) and I’m met with a factor that I hadn’t encountered when writing for the novel: plotting and pacing for real world events and deadlines. I mean, I had a deadline for getting elements of the novel finished (first draft, revisions, submissions, etc).

Identities

Posted by Akira | Posted in Book 2, General Writing, Wild Royal | Posted on 06-03-2011

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Having shelved the novel for a while I started working on an outline. I hadn’t run into a writer’s block, but I did find that I was stuck trying to tie my plots together. I had my romance and I knew how the outcome would be. I had my main plot and I knew how that plot would end. I had my main character’s “journey” detailed so I knew how that would end. The problem was that, in several rewrites, I still hadn’t tied it all together in a neat or semi-neat little package. It was difficult to find the ending to the novel because I just couldn’t tie it all together. Enter Microsoft OneNote. I’m not one to push any type of Microsoft product, but this one has worked for me. I used it in conjunction with a good book, Fill-in-the-Blank Plotting: A Guide to Outlining a Novel Using the Hero’s Journey & Three-Act Structure by Linda George.  I found the book by George THE strategy to use to focus my story and take me through the plotting process to structuring an ending. Using the technique as presented by George was one thing, but I just don’t have the inclination to construct a physical cork board with tons of index cards and push pins. That’s where Microsoft’s OneNote comes in. I used it to simulate the cork board that George presents in her book. It allows the user to create multiple notes of various shapes and sizes and allows the user to move the notes independently of each other all over the screen. It also auto saves so you never have to worry about losing or accidentally deleting a note. It served me well. It is a great electronic cork board and works well for my purposes.